Illinois Exhibits

 

IL-1 Illinois Requirements for Professional Engineers

Illinois Requirements for Professional Engineers

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) regulates the practices of traffic engineers. 225 ILCS 325 Section 4 requires the "professional engineer to apply science", not to misapply science or to omit science, the latter the case in Chicago.

Jan 20, 2018
IL-2 Illinois Professional Engineers Manual for Code Enforcement

Illinois Professional Engineers Manual for Code Enforcement

Page 12 says that incompetence is a criminal offense--a class A misdemeanor and subsequent acts a felony.

Apr 5, 2014
IL-3 Bureau of Design and Environment Manual

Bureau of Design and Environment Manual

Page 57-4.16 says that the yellow change interval equation is in the Bureau of Operations Traffic Policies and Procedures Manual. You will have to get this Operations manual yourself.

Mar 31, 2018
IL-4 Illinois Red Light Camera Law

Illinois Red Light Camera Law

Apr 5, 2014
IL-5 Chicago Red Light Camera Law

Chicago Red Light Camera Law

Apr 5, 2014
IL-6 Illinois Supplement to the MUTCD

Illinois Supplement to the MUTCD

Apr 5, 2014
IL-7 Chicago's Red Light Camera Enforcement Web Site

Chicago's Red Light Camera Enforcement Web Site

Refer to the section "How long are Chicago's yellow lights?":

(1) Chicago sets yellows to 3.0 seconds on roads with speed limits less than 30 mph and to 4.0 for speed limits exceeding 35 mph.

That practice is engineering malpractice. A violation of the MUTCD. Those values are several seconds short of what physics requires of a driver. Also Chicago claims these values are recommended by ITE. These values are not"recommended by ITE. ITE does not have recommendations. ITE only has a practice. But this practice is not an "ITE Recommended Practice". ITE's practice falls short of the laws of physics by several seconds. Chicago's falls shorter than ITE's.

To see how these yellow durations cause everyone to run red lights, do you own computations with this calculator. ( The average passenger driver reacts to an expected event in 1 second and decelerates at 10 ft/s/s, assuming dry pavement and the simplest of intersections. The average commercial truck driver reacts to an expected event in 2.5 seconds and decelerates at 8 ft/s/s. And note that when you use average, you de facto neglect half the driving population.)

When you use the calculator, you will see that the yellow light duration is half the time it takes a driver to stop. Chicago's yellow is even less than that.

Refer to the section "Why not make the yellow light longer?":

All the claims are lies.

(1) "Unfortunately too many drivers believe that the yellow is a sign to speed up."

But the engineering spec on the yellow light requires some drivers to "beat the light".

Proof:

On a 45 mph road, the average passenger sedan needs about 300 feet to stop comfortably and the average school bus needs about 430 feet.

Chicago gives yellows 4 seconds on a 45 mph road.

Is 4 seconds sufficient?

Once the drivers cannot stop comfortably, the sedan must traverse 300 feet and the school bus 430 feet in order to reach the intersection before the light turns red. What speed must they travel?

Use rate x time = distance.

The sedan must accelerate to 51 mph (300 ft / 4 seconds = 75 ft/s = 51 mph) to reach the intersection before the light turns red.

The school bus must accelerate to 63 mph (430 / 4 = 107 ft/s = 63 mph) to reach the intersection before the light turns red.

Both drivers must beat the light.

Now what happens if the legal-minded driver decides to go the speed limit? He enters the intersection a second or two after the light turns red. He enters the intersectionon red not because he is a bad driver, but because he must obey the laws of physics.

A pedestrian has already began walking into the intersection.

(2) "Drivers will treat the extension of the yellow as a green light."

Is a myth. The myth was formally debunked in 1961 in a paper published by Olsen and Rothery. Olsen and Rothery were experts on human factors. The reverse has been demonstrated to be true: Increase the yellow by 1 second and RLRs will permenently decrease by about 70%. There are literally hundreds of millions of examples with no exceptions.

The myth has a history. The claim originates from a scenario that was true only during the 1920s. In the 1920s, a policeman manually operated a traffic signal. The policeman stood out in the middle of the intersection with the traffic signal. He controlled the red, yellow and green by pulling on a lever.

When the policeman wanted to stop the flow of traffic, he'd pull the lever from green to yellow. If a driver was approaching the intersection, the driver could look into the policeman's eye and dare the policemen to hold the yellow longer. The policeman would hold the yellow a little longer enough for the driver to pass. That scenario, now a century obsolete, is the origin of the phrase "drivers will treat the extension of the yellow as a green light." It is also the origin of the phrase "squeezing the lemon."

Apr 5, 2014

 

Illinois Attorneys

These attorneys and experts understand the misapplied physics in the federal standards which force drivers to run red lights.

 

IL-A1 Patrick Keating

Patrick Keating

Roberts McGivney Zagotta LLC
Partner & Chair, Transportation Practice
55 West Monroe, Suite 1700
Chicago, IL 60603
Work: 312-251-2273
Work: 312-878-5200
Mobile: 312-933-4539

 

Apr 8, 2014